Monthly Archives: February 2019

HSK 2 Revision and Practice Starting 22 April 2019

Course Summary

HSK 2 Revision and Practice is to support those learners who are preparing for the HSK 2 test. Learners will have a total of 15 direct contact hours over the period of two weeks. This course is composed of three parts – mock tests, revision and practice. In this course, learners will have the opportunity to take six simulated tests to help them understand the structure of the HSK 2 test. Revision is based on the mock tests where the teacher will identify the individual needs of students and suggest the necessary test skills. In addition to the mock tests and revision, 300 HSK 2 vocabulary and key grammatical structures will be reviewed and practised in this course.

Course Details

Date: 22 April – 2 May

Duration: 2 weeks, 6 sessions (3 sessions each week)

Price: £102/£68 concession

To book and pay online please use the University ePay system. Alternatively download this HSK 2 Revision and Practice Course Form then complete and return it to the Confucius Institute for Scotland with a cheque for the correct amount made out to the University of Edinburgh.

Location: Confucius Institute Campus. You can download a map showing the campus layout here: Conf-campus-map

Timetable

Times
Monday
6:00pm – 8:30pm
Tuesday
6:00pm – 8:30pm
Thursday
6:00pm – 8:30pm
Week 1
(22 – 25 April)
Session 1
(22 April)
Session 2
(23 April)
Session 3
(25 April)
Week 2
(29 April – 2 May)
Session 4
(29 April)
Session 5
(30 April)
Session 6
(2 May)

Course Content

Topic
Content
 Session 1
  • Mock test 1
  • Revision
  • Words/Phrases Enhancement
  •  Mock test 1
  •  Revision and test skills development
  •  HSK 2 vocabulary (1-100)
Session 2
  • Mock test 2
  • Revision
  • Grammar Enhancement
  • Mock test 2
  • Revision and test skills development
  • Grammar: the use of complements
Session 3
  • Mock test 3
  • Revision
  • Words/Phrases Enhancement
  • Mock test 3
  • Revision and test skills development
  • HSK 2 vocabulary (101-200)
Session 4
  • Mock test 4
  • Revision
  • Grammar Enhancement
  • Mock test 4
  • Revision and test skills development
  • Grammar: the use of some common tenses: 正在…呢, 了,着 and过
Session 5
  • Mock test 5
  • Revision
  • Words/Phrases Enhancement
  • Mock test 5
  • Revision and test skills development
  • HSK 2 vocabulary (201-300)
Session 6
  • Mock test 6
  • Revision
  • Grammar Enhancement
  • Mock test 6
  • Revision and test skills development
  • Grammar: the use of number: time, age, price, ordinal number, cardinal number, and weight

Teaching Methods

The class is structured in two stages. A student-centred learning and teaching method is applied in the first stage. A simulated test environment is created to encourage students to familiarise themselves with the real test on their exam day. After the mock test, the teacher will go through the paper. This will be a clinic study style in order to identify the areas students need to improve, and the teacher will provide the learners with the strategies of dealing with scenarios similar to the test.

The second stage applies a teacher-centred method. The teacher will go through the 300 HSK 2 vocabulary and focus on some common grammatical problems that arise among Mandarin language learners.

Essential Readings

Hanban. (2018) Official Examination Papers of HSK – Level 2 2018 Edition. Beijing: Higher Education Press.

Supplementary materials prepared by the teacher.

How strong is your vocabulary?

Try our Vocabulary On-line Self-practice to find out! Student will receive a full set of online practice in class. Before you start the class, why not try one of the below categories first?

HSK 2 Verb

 

 

 

Chinese bronze inscriptions and early Chinese culture and classics, Thu 18 April @6pm

Join us for the second lecture in our 2019 Distinguished Lecture Series when Professor Chen Zhi will give his lecture on Newly discovered bronze inscriptions of the late Shang and early Zhou dynasties and their significance for our understanding of early Chinese culture and classics

Chinese Bronze inscriptions first appeared in the Shang dynasty (17th-11th century B.C.); during the Zhou dynasty, the numbers of bronze ritual vessels with inscriptions increased exponentially. The Zhou bronze inscriptions extended to hundreds of characters. The contents mainly include eulogies of the Zhou ancestors and kings as well as historical records, which help us to fill significant gaps in our knowledge of Chinese history from late Shang through the Western Zhou dynasty (11th century-771 B.C.).

Focusing on recently discovered 11th century B.C. bronze vessels, Prof. Chen Zhi will lead the audience in reading the inscriptions to demonstrate the importance of these excavated texts as sources that require close reading. He will also re-interpret some of the texts of the transmitted Chinese Confucian classics, such as the Book of Odes, the Book of Documents, the Books of Etiquettes, based on the cross-references with these inscriptional documents.

One of these two bronze vessels, Ziyun Fuyi you (子㽙父乙卣), excavated from the tomb of Marquis of Haihun 海昏 (92-59 B.C.) of Western Han, apparently was a late Shang antique among the collection of the ill-fated monarch. The other Late Shang bronze Fu zun (婦尊) appeared on the antique market of Hong Kong in 2013. The content of the inscriptions on the Fu zun is about a royal wedding of a Shang King, possibly the notorious last ruler Zhou 紂 and one of his concubines.

Prof Chen will illustrate how the linguistic features of these inscriptional texts, such as the personal names of the Shang nobles, the terms of musical performance and instruments, and mentions of the sacrifices and etiquettes, etc can be analyzed to further our understanding of China’s ancient past.

Professor Chen Zhi holds a Bachelor’s degree in History from Peking University and a M. Phil in Chinese Literature from Nanjing University. He also has a PhD degree in Chinese studies from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, USA. Professor Chen started his teaching at National University of Singapore, Middlebury College and the UW-Madison. He joined HKBU in 2000, and served as Acting Dean of Arts, Chair Professor in Chinese Literature and the founding Director of the Jao Tsung-I Academy of Sinology. Currently he is concurrently appointed to the Vice President in Academic Affairs of BNU-HKBU United International College (UIC) at Zhuhai.

Professor Chen’s research interests lie in the areas of Chinese classics, bronze inscriptions, and ancient history of China. His publications include The Legacy of the Odes, Documents, Ritual Music (Chinese); The Shaping of the Book of Songs: From Ritualization to Secularization (English), Papers on Interdisciplinary Study of the Book of Odes (Chinese). He also has had dozens of papers in Chinese and English published in China, Taiwan, Europe and USA. Professor Chen is the editor of the Early China Book Series (Shanghai Classics), founding Chief Editor of the Bulletin of the Jao Tsung-I Academy of Sinology (Chung Hwa), the founding Editor of the Jao Tsung-I Library of Sinology (De Gruyter), and the founding Associate Editor of Journal of Early Chinese Philosophers (Shanghai Classics).

Date: Thursday, 18 April 2019

Time: 6pm – 7:30pm.

Location: Confucius Institute for Scotland, Abden House, 1 Marchhall Crescent, Edinburgh. EH16 5HP

A drinks reception follows after the lecture and Q&A.

All Welcome. Booking is required!

 

 

 

HSK 3 Revision and Practice Starting 22 April 2019

Course Summary

HSK 3 Revision and Practice is to support those learners who are preparing for the HSK 3 test. Learners will have a total of 15 direct contact hours over the period of two weeks. This course is composed of three parts – mock tests, revision and practice. In this course, learners will have the opportunity to take a simulated test to help them understand the structure of the HSK 3 test. Revision is based on the four mock tests, where the teacher will identify the individual needs of students and suggest the necessary test skills. In addition to the mock tests and revision, 600 HSK 3 vocabulary and key grammatical structures will be reviewed and practised in this course.

Course Details

Date: 22 April – 2 May

Duration: 2 weeks, 6 sessions (3 sessions each week)

Price: £102/£68 concession

To book and pay online please use the University ePay system. Alternatively download this HSK 3 Revision and Practice Course Form then complete and return it to the Confucius Institute for Scotland with a cheque for the correct amount made out to the University of Edinburgh.

Location: Confucius Institute Campus. You can download a map showing the campus layout here: Conf-campus-map

Timetable

Times Monday

6:00pm – 8:30pm

Tuesday

6:00pm – 8:30pm

Thursday

6:00pm – 8:30pm

Week 1

(22 – 25 April)

Session 1

(22 April)

Session 2

(23 April)

Session 3

(25 April)

Week 2

(29 April – 2 May)

Session 4

(29 April)

Session 5

(30 April)

Session 6

(2 May)

Course Content

Topic

Content

 Session 1
  • Mock test 1
  • Revision
  • Words/Phrases Enhancement
  •  Mock test 1
  •  Revision and test skills development
  •  HSK 3 vocabulary (1-100)
Session 2
  • Revision
  • Words/Phrases Enhancement
  • Grammar Enhancement
  • Revision and test skills development
  • HSK 3 vocabulary (101-200) 
  • Grammar: particle of 的,得 and 地

Homework: Self-test paper 2

Session 3
  • Revision
  • Words/Phrases Enhancement
  • Grammar Enhancement
  • Revision and test skills development
  • HSK 2 vocabulary (201-300)
  • Grammar:conjunction words of 和, 因为…所以…,但是,虽然,而且,然后,如果,一边,或者 and 还是

Homework: Self-test paper 3

Session 4
  • Revision
  • Words/Phrases Enhancement
  • Grammar Enhancement

 

  • Revision and test skills development
  • HSK 3 vocabulary (301-400)
  • Grammar: sentence indicating existence

Homework: Self-test paper 4

Session 5
  • Revision
  • Words/Phrases Enhancement
  • Grammar Enhancement

 

  • Revision and test skills development
  • HSK 3 vocabulary (401-500)
  • Grammar: tenses including 正在…呢,了,过,要…了 and 着

Homework: Self-test paper 5

Session 6
  • Revision
  • Words/Phrases Enhancement
  • Grammar Enhancement
  • Revision and test skills development
  • HSK 3 vocabulary (501-600)
  • Grammar: Comparison and Similarity including 比,和(跟)…一样,没有(有)…那么(这么)

Teaching Methods

The class is structured in two stages. A student-centred learning and teaching method is applied in the first stage. A simulated test environment is created to encourage students to familiarise themselves with the real test on their exam day. At the end of each session, additional mock papers will be given to students as homework. The teacher will go through the paper in the next session. During the revision, a clinic study style will be applied. Teachers will identify the areas students need to improve, and provide the learners with the strategies of dealing with the scenarios similar to the test.

The second stage is a teacher-centred teaching style. The teacher will go through the 600 HSK 3 vocabulary and focus on some common grammatical problems that arise among Mandarin language learners.

Essential Readings

Hanban. (2018) Official Examination Papers of HSK – Level 3 2018 Edition. Beijing: Higher Education Press.

Supplementary materials prepared by the teacher.

How strong is your vocabulary?

Try our Vocabulary On-line Self-practice to find out! Student will receive a full set of online practice in class. Before you start the class, why not try one of the below categories first?

HSK 3 Noun Part 1

HSK 3 Verb Part 2

HSK 3 Preposition

 

 

Locating Fey Mou(s): The Topos of Chinese Film Theory by Victor Fan, 26 March, 6-8pm

Location: 50 George Square, Project Room (1.06), University of Edinburgh

A screening of Spring in a Small Town (dir. Fey Mou, 1948) is held on Monday, 25 Mar, 4-5:30 pm at David Hume Tower, LG. 06

Chinese film theory and criticism are often considered being radically different from their Euro-American counterparts. Yet, during the Republic period (1911–49), under colonialism and semicolonialism, Chinese filmmakers, critics, and intellectuals discussed the cinema with a vocabulary and an epistemic space that are already cross-cultural and inter-regional. In other words, ‘Chinese’ film theory has always been a comparative discursive space.

Yet, how do we reconstruct and rethink this comparative space so that we can make it useful for film and media studies today? In my seminar, I would like to use the theories of Fei Mu (Fey Mou, 1906–51) as a case study. Fey is best remembered for his 1946 classic Xiaocheng zhi chun (Spring in a Small Town, Wen Hwa Film Company). This film is about the unrequited love between a young doctor, Zhang Zhichen (Li Wei), and his former lover Zhou Yuwen (Wei Wei) now the wife of his best friend, Dai Liyan (Shi Yu). What could have been a melodrama was shot and edited in a highly lyrical style, with a series of long takes, elegant camera movements, and deep staging. Yet many people today forget that Fey was also a prolific writer of film criticism. In this presentation, I analyse Fey’s film theory in association with Spring in a Small Town, to examine how for him, cinema conveys a xingshi guan (view of forms), rensheng guan (view of life), and zhengzhi guan (view of politics). I shall do so by opening a comparative space between his theoretical writings and those of David Bordwell, Kristen Thompson, Christian Metz, and André Bazin on the relationship between art and reality. I argue that Fey’s ontological view is based in his belief in cinema’s ability to make present an absence, that is to allow life, its ontological order, and its regulating principles to manifest themselves without preaching them. Rather, they become palpable when the film image reveals the profound mundaneness of life, in which desire, longing, hope, and their attendant frustration and desolation obstinately hover around the cinematographic image as reality.

Victor Fan is Senior Lecturer in Film Studies at King’s College London. He is Film Consultant of Chinese Visual Festival (London). Prior to his position at King’s, he was Assistant Professor at the Department of East Asian Studies, McGill University. Fan graduated with a Ph.D. from the Film Studies Program and the Comparative Literature Department of Yale University, and an MFA in Film and Television Productions at School of Cinema-Television (now School of Cinematic Arts), University of Southern California. He is the author of Cinema Approaching Reality: Locating Chinese Film Theory, published in 2015 by the University of Minnesota Press. His articles have been published in peer-review journals including Asian Cinema, World Picture Journal, Camera Obscura, Journal of Chinese Cinemas, Screen, Film History: An International Journal, CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture, anthologies A Companion to Rainer Werner Fassbinder and American and Chinese-Language Cinemas, film magazines 24 Images: Cinéma, Dianying yishu [Film Art], Zihua [Zifaa or Word blossoms], and Siyi.  His film The Well was an official selection of the São Paolo International Film Festival; it was also screened at the Anthology Film Archives, the Japan Society and the George Eastman House.

Besides his academic career, Fan is also a working composer. He was a performance artist with his own theatre company Post [ET]2! in Hong Kong between 1993 and 1996. He also worked as a freelance sound editor, film composer and re-recording mixer, and later on with Fissionarts (Los Angeles) and Solar Film/Video Productions (NYC) between the late 1990s and the mid 2000s. In New York, he also wrote for the magazines Film Festival Reporter and Film Festival Today, covering news from the MIX Festival, the New York Underground Film Festival, the African Diaspora Film Festival and MOXIE Film.

 

Registration deadline Thursday 21 February for offline HSK exam on 23 March

HSK is a globally run standardised test of Chinese language proficiency for non-native speakers. Whether to ensure eligibility for scholarships offered by Hanban, to gain an advantage in the job market or a related academic field an HSK pass will serve you.  And of course, for many adult learners, an exam is a great motivator for learning!

Our Institute can offer three opportunities to sit the HSK and HSKK (oral) exams in 2019. Dates for the exams are

  • Saturday 23 March 2019
    Register by 21 February for HSK and HSKK offline exam
    Register by 7 March for HSK online exam 

    Exam workshop: Saturday 9 March 2019
  • Saturday 11 May 2019
    Register by 11 April for HSK and HSKK offline exam
    Register by 25 April for online exam 

    Exam workshop: Saturday 27 April 2019
  • Saturday 30 November 2019
    Register by 31 October for HSK and HSKK offline exam.
    Register by 14 Nov for online exam
    Exam workshop: Saturday 16 November 2019

Please view our short video to learn more about this global exam and read on for detailed information on the various levels and FAQs.

If you are interested in working or studying in China or in applying for a Confucius Institute Scholarship in the future, then HSK, the Chinese Proficiency Certificate, is of interest to you.

HSK REGISTRATION

Applications for HSK exam will be available via the University of Edinburgh’s ePay website.  Please note this system does not offer a ‘shopping basket’ function. If you want to book more than one exam level or to book both HSK and the oral exam, HSKK,  you need to go through the booking process for each item you wish to book.

In addition to the online application and payment system please note you must also send two signed passport photographs (per exam) to the Confucius Institute for Scotland, Abden House, 1 Marchhall Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 5HP.

An exam admission ticket will be posted to the address you provide on the form. You MUST bring this admission ticket and the identification document you used when registering with you.

March 2019 HSK and HSKK exam registrations are now open. Please register your exam via the links below.

HSK (offline option)

HSK (online option)

HSKK (offline option only)

HSK Preparation

Prior to each exam diet the Institute will run a free workshop to introduce candidates to the exam format and strictures. It is highly recommended that all first time candidates attend this workshop.

A briefing will also be provided to those candidates taking the oral element of the HSK known as HSKK.

You can download sample papers online. Check out Hanban’s free online assessment website where these materials can also be found.

Online or Offline?

Candidates can sit the HSK in an on-line or off-line format. Generally we recommend that more advanced students, who are comfortable with using a keyboard to input pinyin and select the appropriate character, opt for the on-line exam. For less experienced students the off-line i.e. paper format exam is recommended.

The exam duration varies from 40 minutes at Level 1 to 135 minutes for Level 6.

FAQs

What is HSK? Levels 1-6: explanation of the different levels.
Why should I take an HSK exam?
What is the exam entry fee?
How do I find out which level of the test I should take?

What is HSK?

HSK (Hanyu shuiping kaoshi, i.e. Chinese proficiency certificate) is the official PRC standardised exam to assess Chinese language proficiency of non-native Chinese speakers. This category includes British, other nationalities, overseas Chinese and Chinese national minorities.

HSK is conducted at six levels running from 1-6. Please see the detailed information sheet outlining the examination standard for each level using the PDF links below.

pdfHSK-level-1 2018
For students who have studied for 40-80 hours, have a vocabulary of approx 150 words and the corresponding grammar points

pdfHSK-level-2 2018
For students who have studied for 80-120 hours, have a vocabulary of around 300 basic Chinese words and related grammar points.

pdf HSK-level-3 2018
For students who have studied between 120-180 hours who have acquired around 600 basic Chinese words and related vocabulary points.

pdfHSK-level-4 2018
For students who have studied Chinese for two academic years, 2-4 classes per week and achieved 1200 words and related grammar points.

pdf HHSK-level-5 2018
For students who have studied Chinese for more than 2 years (2-4 classes per week) who have a vocabulary of 2500 basic Chinese words and related grammar points.

pdf HSK-level-6-2018
For students who have at least 5000 basic Chinese words and related grammar.

Why Should I Take an HSK Exam?

HSK is the only official Chinese language certificate accepted in mainland China. It is used by educational institutions and potential employers to:

  1. Certify that the holder has acquired the required Chinese proficiency to enter Chinese educational institutions as an undergraduate or postgraduate student
  2. Certify that the holder can be exempt from studying Chinese courses at certain levels
  3. Ensure suitable level of language skills as a reference point for employers recruiting non-native Chinese staff
  4. Eligibility for some scholarships requires HSK certification
  5. Adult learners are motivated to learn through assessment

What is the exam entry fee?

  • In 2019 the HSK Level 1 exam fee is only £10
  • In 2019 HSK Levels 2 and 3 have an entry fee of £30
  • In 2019 HSK Levels 4, 5, and 6 entry fee is £40

For those candidates who wish to test their speaking skills we also offer an Oral Examination component known as HSKK. This is offered at an additional cost of £15 and is optional but recommended.

Questions?

Should you have any questions please do get in touch:

Confucius Institute for Scotland in the University of Edinburgh,
Abden House,
1 Marchhall Crescent,
Edinburgh, EH16 5HP

Tel: +44 (0) 131 662 2180
Fax: +44 (0) 131 662 2199
Email: info@confuciusinstitute.ac.uk

Chinese Language Classes Holiday This Week

Happy Spring Festival to all our students and friends!  Due to the Chinese New Year holiday (New Year’s Day is February 5), no evening classes will be held at the Confucius Institute for Scotland this week.  They will resume again as normal on February 11. 新年快乐!吉祥如意!We will be holding our annual party on February 8 from 6pm-9pm. Please sign up at:  https://edin.ac/2FSWKmT