Yearly Archives: 2019

5 Weeks Daytime Chinese Calligraphy Starts 4 March – CANCELLED

The five week course runs from Wednesday morning 4 March to 1 April 2020 will be led by Chi Zhang, the Institute’s experienced calligraphy teacher. This course will start by introducing common techniques related to the Chinese soft brushes and ink. Students will also learn the basic strokes of Regular Style. Regular Style (Kai Shu) is most common in modern writings and publications. This writing style is suitable for both beginners and students who learned Clerical Style before. With a maximum of 12 students in the class plenty of personal attention is guaranteed as well as clear demonstrations and instructions to help students develop their skills.

Students can anticipate completing at least one piece of Chinese calligraphy artwork per class. The contents of this work could be a selected Chinese poems or perhaps an ancient master’s quotation.

The cost is £125 for the 12.5 hour course which runs Wednesday mornings from 10.00am – 12.30pm from 4 March 2020. There is a concession rate of £100, which is offered only to full time students. The fee includes all materials. A minimum of five students are required to ensure the class goes ahead.

To secure your place on this enjoyable course please use the University’s ePay system or you can download this PDF Form which you will then need to complete and return to our office with a cheque made out to the University of Edinburgh for the appropriate amount. (Please note we are no longer accepting cash payment in our office)

This course will be led by Chi Zhang, experienced art tutor, shortlisted of ‘Sky Art Landscape Artist of the year 2015’. For more information and see Chi’s work please visit http://www.chizhangartist.com

If you have any questions please contact us on 0131 662 2180 or email info@confuciusinstitute.ac.uk

KEY INFORMATION

Course: Five week Chinese Calligraphy – Regular style (Daytime)
Date + Time: Wednesday Mornings: 4 March – 1 April 2020, 10:00-12:30pm
Cost: £125 (£100) including all materials
Location: Confucius Institute for Scotland Campus, Abden House

One to one tutorials and small group workshops can also be arranged. Please email info@confuciusinstitute.ac.uk or call us on0131 662 2180 to discuss further.

5 Weeks Daytime Chinese Brush Painting Starts 5 March – CANCELLED

Discover the fascinating art of Chinese brush painting and try your hand at this expressive art form. This course is suitable for beginners or people who have painting experience but have never tried Chinese brush painting techniques before. No prior knowledge is necessary, you should simply be keen to learn and willing to hold a brush. All the materials used during the course will be provided.

Using Chinese soft brushes, ink and colors, you will be shown how to achieve wonderful animal paintings in freehand Xieyi style. Participants will have the option to select from a range of subjects demonstrated by the tutor, such as Crane, a mystical creature in China, Japan and other East Asian countries, is the symbol of longevity and good fortune, tiger symbolizes determination and strength and Giant panda, the black & white fur is also perfect for monochrome ink painting.

Students can anticipate completing at least one piece of Chinese painting artwork per class. Demonstration and plenty of personal attention will be provided during the class. This course is suitable for both beginners and advanced students.

The cost is £125 for the 12.5 hour course which runs Thursday mornings from 10.00am – 12.30pm from 5 March 2020. There is a concession rate of £100, which is offered only to full time students. The fee includes all materials. A minimum of five students are required to ensure the class goes ahead.

To secure your place on this enjoyable course please use the University’s ePay system or you can download this PDF Form which you will then need to complete and return to our office with a cheque made out to the University of Edinburgh for the appropriate amount. (Please note we are no longer accepting cash payment in our office)

This course will be led by Chi Zhang, experienced art tutor, shortlisted of ‘Sky Art Landscape Artist of the year 2015’. For more information and see Chi’s work please visit http://www.chizhangartist.com

If you have any questions please contact us on 0131 662 2180 or email info@confuciusinstitute.ac.uk

KEY INFORMATION
Course: Five week Chinese Brush Painting – Xieyi style (Daytime)
Date + Time: Thursday Mornings: 5 March – 2 April, 10:00-12:30pm
Cost: £125 (£100) including all materials
Location: Confucius Institute for Scotland Campus, Abden House

One to one tutorials and small group workshops can also be arranged. Please email info@confuciusinstitute.ac.uk or call us on0131 662 2180 to discuss further.

HSK 3 Revision and Practice Starting 12 February

Course Summary

HSK 3 Revision and Practice is to support those learners who are preparing for the HSK 3 test. Learners will have a total of 15 direct contact hours over the period of six weeks. This course is composed of three parts – mock tests, revision and practice. In this course, learners will have the opportunity to take a simulated test to help them understand the structure of the HSK 3 test. Revision is based on the four mock tests, where the teacher will identify the individual needs of students and suggest the necessary test skills. In addition to the mock tests and revision, 600 HSK 3 vocabulary and key grammatical structures will be reviewed and practised in this course.

Course Details

Date: 12 February 2020 – 18 March 2020

Time: Wednesday Evenings: 6pm-8:30pm

Price: £102/£68 concession

To secure your place on this course please use the University’s ePay system or download this HSK 3 Revision and Practice Course Form then complete and return it to the Confucius Institute for Scotland with a cheque for the correct amount made out to the University of Edinburgh. Please note that our office is no longer accept cash.

Location: Confucius Institute Campus. You can download a map showing the campus layout here: Conf-campus-map

Course Content

Topic

Content

 Session 1
  • Mock test 1
  • Revision
  • Words/Phrases Enhancement
  •  Mock test 1
  •  Revision and test skills development
  •  HSK 3 vocabulary (1-100)
Session 2
  • Revision
  • Words/Phrases Enhancement
  • Grammar Enhancement
  • Revision and test skills development
  • HSK 3 vocabulary (101-200) 
  • Grammar: particle of 的,得 and 地

Homework: Self-test paper 2

Session 3
  • Revision
  • Words/Phrases Enhancement
  • Grammar Enhancement
  • Revision and test skills development
  • HSK 2 vocabulary (201-300)
  • Grammar:conjunction words of 和, 因为…所以…,但是,虽然,而且,然后,如果,一边,或者 and 还是

Homework: Self-test paper 3

Session 4
  • Revision
  • Words/Phrases Enhancement
  • Grammar Enhancement

 

  • Revision and test skills development
  • HSK 3 vocabulary (301-400)
  • Grammar: sentence indicating existence

Homework: Self-test paper 4

Session 5
  • Revision
  • Words/Phrases Enhancement
  • Grammar Enhancement

 

  • Revision and test skills development
  • HSK 3 vocabulary (401-500)
  • Grammar: tenses including 正在…呢,了,过,要…了 and 着

Homework: Self-test paper 5

Session 6
  • Revision
  • Words/Phrases Enhancement
  • Grammar Enhancement
  • Revision and test skills development
  • HSK 3 vocabulary (501-600)
  • Grammar: Comparison and Similarity including 比,和(跟)…一样,没有(有)…那么(这么)

Teaching Methods

The class is structured in two stages. A student-centred learning and teaching method is applied in the first stage. A simulated test environment is created to encourage students to familiarise themselves with the real test on their exam day. At the end of each session, additional mock papers will be given to students as homework. The teacher will go through the paper in the next session. During the revision, a clinic study style will be applied. Teachers will identify the areas students need to improve, and provide the learners with the strategies of dealing with the scenarios similar to the test.

The second stage is a teacher-centred teaching style. The teacher will go through the 600 HSK 3 vocabulary and focus on some common grammatical problems that arise among Mandarin language learners.

Essential Readings

Hanban. (2018) Official Examination Papers of HSK – Level 3 2018 Edition. Beijing: Higher Education Press.

Supplementary materials prepared by the teacher.

How strong is your vocabulary?

Try our Vocabulary On-line Self-practice to find out! Student will receive a full set of online practice in class. Before you start the class, why not try one of the below categories first?

HSK 3 Noun Part 1

HSK 3 Verb Part 2

HSK 3 Preposition

 

 

Giant Lanterns Lost Worlds at Edinburgh Zoo 15 Nov – 26 Jan 2020

Picture by Stewart Attwood

The award-winning Giant Lanterns returns to Edinburgh Zoo, but with a whole new theme for 2019. Running across 47-nights, this extravaganza is based around a Lost Worlds theme, where hundreds of prehistoric creatures will be brought to life to present a visually stunning display of the history of wildlife. 

Discover 570 million years of wildlife, from when the origins of life appeared as a dazzling array of tiny microbes, to a world where dinosaurs were born and the ice age gave way to the forgotten giants of the animal kingdom.

This is the third year the Confucius Institute for Scotland in the University of Edinburgh in partnership with Royal Zoological Society of Scotland (RZSS) for this season’s Giant Lanterns festival. 

Book your ticket from Edinburgh Zoo website HERE

Strange Tales (聊斋), Traverse Theatre, 30 Nov – 21 Dec 2019

When wind and snow fill the sky and the fire has grown cold, relight the coals, warm the wine and turn up the wick of the lamp. We enter these tales in the shadows of night, but hopefully emerge into daylight.

Strange Tales is presented by theatre company Grid Iron in co-production with the Traverse Theatre and in partnership with The Confucius Institute for Scotland in the University of Edinburgh.

Based on Pu Songling’s legendary Strange Tales from a Chinese Studio, audiences can expect to be beguiled and bewitched by brand new adaptations of a selection of these renowned tales, involving innovative new digital technology, puppetry and illusion. Though written centuries ago, they feel remarkably current, reflecting and commenting upon many aspects of modern society – greed, attraction, arrogance and hope, among many others. But you must enter the production’s immersive and spellbinding world with an open mind and a brave heart if you’re to escape these tales ever again….

Adapted by Pauline Lockhart (Schooled) and Ben Harrison (Jury Play, Spring Awakening) from a selection of Pu Songling’s original tales, Strange Tales will wrap itself around you and make you shiver in delight and fright on Edinburgh’s dark winter nights.

Date: Saturday 30 November – Saturday 21 December

Location: Traverse Theatre, 10 Cambridge St, Edinburgh EH1 2ED

Price: Previews £15 / £10 / £5 | Full price £20 | Standard concession £16 | Under 30s / Student £14 | Other concession £5

Age guide: 14+

Detailed information about the show and to book the ticket, please visit Traverse website: HERE 

Chinese Brush Painting – one day workshop on Saturday 23 November

Bamboo has significant culture importance in China and other East Asian countries, represents good character of real gentleman and nobles. The traditional of bamboo and orchid painting had been around for many centuries and some techniques had been used for over 1000 years.

This one day workshop will start with introducing the history of Chinese bamboo painting then the common techniques related to the Chinese soft brushes and ink. Students can anticipate completing at least 3 pieces of Chinese painting artwork during the workshop. Demonstration and plenty of personal attention will be provided during the class. This workshop is suitable for both beginners and advanced students.

To secure your place on this enjoyable course please download this PDF Form which you will then need to complete and return to our office with a cheque made out to the University of Edinburgh for the appropriate amount. (Please note we are no longer accepting cash payment in our office)

The workshop will be led by our institute’s artist Chi Zhang. For more information and to see Chi’s work please visit HERE.

One-to-one tutorials and small group workshops can also be arranged.
Please email info@confuciusinstitute.ac.uk or call us on 0131 662 2180 to discuss.

KEY INFORMAITON

DATE: SATURDAY 23 NOVEMBER

TIME: 10AM-4PM

COST: £50 (£40) including all materials

LOCATION: Confucius Institute for Scotland Campus, Abden House

 

Special Lectures on Chinese Art – 28 & 29 Oct

Professor Jing Lyu | Fudan University, Shanghai

Lecture 1: Retrieving the Glory of Lacquerware in Ancient China
28 Oct 2019 16:30-17:30 | Seminar Room A, Fire Station, Edinburgh College of Art
Lecture 2: Between Innovation and Tradition: Xiaojiaochang New Year Prints in Shanghai
29 Oct 2019 11:10-13:00 | Seminar Room C, Fire Station, Edinburgh College of Art

Jing Lyu (吕静) is a Professor in the Department of Cultural Heritage and Museology at Fudan University, Shanghai. She obtained her bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in history at Fudan University and completed a doctorate in literature at Tokyo University. Before joining Fudan University in 2005, she served as a researcher at the Institute of History of Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences and the Institute of Oriental Culture of Tokyo University, and lecturer at the University of Sacred Heart. The research interest of Professor Lyu includes the ancient history of China, the history and society of East Asia, and cultural relics. She focuses on the study of oracle bones, bronzes, bamboo slips, lacquerware and intangible cultural heritage. Her books include Research of Mengshi (盟誓) in Spring and Autumn Period: A Reconstruction of Society based on Religious Cults (2007) and The Collection of Oracle Bones at Fudan University (2019), and translation of The Society and Country of Ancient China (2018). She also manages more than ten research projects, including the art project of National Social Science Fund, The Investigation and Research on Ancient Chinese Lacquerware collected in Japan, Shanghai Philosophy and Social Science Project, Shanghai Pujiang Talent Project, Project of National Cultural Relics Bureau, and the international project funded by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. Professor Lyu is the awardee of research excellent of Shanghai Philosophy and Social Science (2011).

Lecture 1: Retrieving the Glory of Lacquerware in Ancient China
28 Oct 2019 16:30-17:30 | Seminar Room A, Fire Station, Edinburgh College of Art

China is the only original country of lacquer throughout the world, and lacquerware, which is made of lacquer, is an invention of ancient China in prehistoric times. By using lacquer as glue or enhancer, this kind of artefact was more multifunctional and endurable, especially in an ancient society where resources were limited and tools were rude. The production and use of lacquerware not only show the wisdom of Chinese ancestors, but also make great contributions to world civilisation. The technique of producing lacquerware also has a significant influence in neighbouring countries, such as Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Thailand, Burma and Cambodia.

At least 8,000 years ago, the residents living along the Lower Yangtze River had been varnishing artefacts with lacquer. After the end of the Bronze Age and before the mass production of porcelain,
lacquerware reached the first peak in the history of China. During the first peak, from the Warring
States Period to the Han Dynasty, the amount and types of lacquerwares exploded. They appeared in nearly every aspect of life, including catering and ceremonial vessels, entertainment equipment, furniture, architecture, religious utensils, military affairs, etc. Various techniques were applied on
lacquerwares, like varnishing, painting, needle painting, metal embroidering, metal foil decorating and inlay. Both nobles and civilians were able to use lacquerware in their daily life due to its availability in quantity, so that lacquerware helped to enhance living quality in early China.

Later in the Tang Dynasty, the technique of lacquerware was highly advanced. As Tang culture spread out into Korea and Japan, lacquerware also permeated the society, politics, religion and art in these countries, which marked the second peak of Chinese lacquerware. The third peak was located from the Song to the Qing Dynasty when the techniques of lacquerware, such as carving, gold and silver inlay, and mother-of-pearl inlay, advanced to the pinnacle and brought incomparable aesthetic experience. This period symbols the optimal level of Chinese lacquerware. The lecture will first give an overview of the development of lacquerware in China. It will also discuss how the production of lacquerware contributed to the cross-cultural and artistic interactions between countries in East Asia.

Lecture 2: Between Innovation and Tradition: Xiaojiaochang New Year Prints in Shanghai
29 Oct 2019 11:10-13:00 | Seminar Room C, Fire Station, Edinburgh College of Art

Chinese New Year Prints originated from the door gods with the meaning of lustrum on time change (New Year). After the Song Dynasty, with the development of block printing, New Year Prints were in mass production and were increasingly accessible to the masses. The customs were further flourished. New Year Prints from different regions had different genres and styles, mainly four popular styles were recognised. Derived from Taohuawu New Year Prints in Suzhou, Xiaojiaochang New Year Prints in Shanghai is a carrier of Shanghai School’s artistic expression. Not only delivering realistic themes, diversified forms, westernized materials and modernized technology, such type of prints had a strong aftereffect, which laid the foundation for the emergence of novel advertising pictures and popular calendar posters (yuefenpai) of modern Shanghai.

Please note the lectures will be given in Chinese with spontaneous translation.

All Welcome!

Chinese Oracle Bones exhibiton and sportlight talk at the National Museum of Scotland

Discover some of the treasures within the National Museum Scotland’s significant collection of oracle bones, the second largest in the world outside of China. Inscribed with earliest known Chinese writing, the bones were used for divination during the late Shang dynasty (c.1200-1050 BC).

This exhibition will run from 25 Oct 2019 to 29 March 2020. For detailed information please visit National Museum of Scotland website HERE.

Spotlight talk:

‘Dragon bones’ and the earliest known Chinese script by curator Dr Qin Cao

Location: Auditorium, Level 1,  National Museum of Scotland

Date and Time: 28 November 2019, 14:00-15:00

Free Admission. Book your place HERE.

 

 

Chinese Film Documentary IV: The Next Life + A Second Child on 11 November

Fan Jian is a documentarian who focuses on Chinese social issues through character-driven storytelling. He has directed six feature-length documentary films, most recently Still Tomorrow, winner of a Special Jury Award at IDFA 2016. His films The Next Life (2011) follows a working-class couple lost their only child in the 2008 Sichuan Earthquake. When the earthquake hit, Zhu, the father, tried to rescue his beloved daughter from the rubble but failed, plunging the couple’s happy life into darkness and uncertainty. The sequel, a short entitled A Second Child (2019) records how the same couple struggle to recover from the painful past.

When talking about the film and the time he spent with the couple, Fan Jian said, “The long-term mental health damage to disaster survivors is equally as severe as the physical and economic damage to environment and society. This issue requires our immediate attention.”

These screenings form a part of Earth in Crisis Chinese Eco-documentary UK Tour curated by the Chinese Independent Film Network UK and sponsored by UK Arts and Humanities Research Council. The tour showcases a series of Chinese Eco-documentary films foregrounding the growing ecological emergency facing our planet and aims to encourage the discussion of such topics as sustainable development, anthropogenic climate change and human-environment relationships in the UK.

Join us for the opportunity to see The Next Life and A Second Child and also to meet the film director.

Date: Monday 11 November 2019

Location: Screening room (G.04), 50 George Square, EH8 9JU

Programme: 

17:30: Registration
18:00 – 19:30: Film Screening: The next life (2011)
19:30 – 20:00: Drinks Reception
20:00-20:30: Film Screening: A second child (2019)
20:30-21:00: Q&A

Tickets are free and can be secured by booking from HERE.