Monthly Archives: November 2017

The Chinese Common Reader: Joan Judge 15 Feb 2018 6pm

In Search of the Chinese Common Reader: Usuable Knowledge & Wondrous Ignorance in the Age of Global Science

How did late Qing and Republican Chinese common readers understand science, illness, and the natural world? To what extent did new concepts introduced into China from the mid-to late-19th century become integrated into the everyday lives of poorer urbanites and lower-level local elites? What can an investigation of these questions tell us about the ways knowledge was transmitted, and the degree of epistemological, social, and cultural integration in this period?

Join us to hear from Professor Joan Judge of York University, Canada in this lecture entitled In Search of the Chinese Common Reader: Usable Knowledge and Wondrous Ignorance in the Age of Global Science. In her presentation she will consider one of the great paradoxes of twentieth century Chinese history: the rhetorical prominence of “the people” in dynastic, reformist, Republican and communist discourse, and the relative invisibility of non-elite ways of knowing in the historical record.

It searches for the Chinese common reader in three distinct places: in the materiality of cheaply produced texts-books as objects; in the usable-and wondrous-information packaged in their crowded pages—texts as meaning; and in the spaces where this knowledge was consumed—reading as cultural practice. The texts include cheap, string-bound, lithographed books such as wanbao quanshu 萬寶全書 (comprehensive compendia of myriad treasures), together with daily-use, letter-writing, household, and health manuals. Their contents include age-old cosmologies and fanciful representations of foreigners, together with treatments for opium addiction, methods for preventing cholera, and ways to graft a plant. The apprentices, workers, housewives, and lower-level bureaucrats who consumed this knowledge often did so on the fly, in the streets. Sitting, standing or leaning at street-side bookstalls, they avidly sought both the useful information and the marvelous diversion necessary to negotiate the epistemological uncertainty—and promise—of China’s revolutionary twentieth century.

Biography

Joan Judge is Professor in the Department of History at York University in Toronto, Canada. She is the author of Republican Lens: Gender, Visuality, and Experience in the Early Chinese Periodical Press (2015), The Precious Raft of History: The Past, the West, and the Woman Question in China (2008), Print and Politics: ‘Shibao’ and the Culture of Reform in Late Qing China (1996), and co-editor of Women and the Periodical Press in China’s Global Twentieth Century: A Space of Their Own? (forthcoming), and Beyond Exemplar Tales: Women’s Biography in Chinese History (2011). She is currently engaged in a project with the working title “In Search of the Chinese Common Reader: Usable Knowledge and Wondrous Ignorance in the Age of Global Science, 1870-1955″.

The venue for this lecture will be Seminar Room LG.09, lower ground floor, David Hume Tower

Please book your seat via this Eventbrite link.

Chinese Language Classes
April-June 2018

We offer a diverse programme of evening classes for the general public to enjoy learning Chinese. Our Spring 2018 courses will start week beginning 23 April, and booking for these classes is now open.  With a choice of classes for complete beginners – including a day time 5 weeks course – Chinese for Travellers – we think we have a class to suit you.

All classes take place on the Confucius Institute for Scotland Campus sitting in the shadow of Arthur’s Seat. You can download a map showing the campus layout here – Conf-campus-map

LANGUAGE CLASSES April – june 2018

If you have some previous learning and have not yet started classes with us please get in touch and we can arrange an assessment to ensure you are placed in the most suitable class. For this, or any other questions please email info@confuciusinstitute.ac.uk. You can also call us on 0131 662 2180.

Please note that course names have been changed to reflect the Common European Framework for Modern Languages.  The table below gives the previous names of courses in second position.

SPRING 2018 Timetable

CLass level Code Day(s) Dates-all 2018 Time Full Price / Student
Chinese for Travellers  CH058-301 Tuesday 24 April -22 May 10:00 12:30am £85/£70
Beginners 1
Chinese 1.1
CH060-301 Monday 23 April – 25 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87
Beginners 1
Chinese 1.1
CH060-302 Thursday 26 April – 28 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87
Beginners 2
Chinese 1.2
CH061-301 Monday 23 April – 25 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87
Beginners 3
Chinese 1.3
CH062-301 Thursday 26 April – 28 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87
Elementary 1
Chinese 2.1
CH063-301 Monday 23 April – 25 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87
Elementary 2  Chinese 2.2 CH064-301 Thursday 26 April – 28 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87
Elementary 3  Chinese 2.3 CH065-301 Tuesday 24 April – 26 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87
Intermediate 1
Chinese 3.1
CH066-301 Monday 23 April – 25 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87
Intermediate 2
Chinese 3.2
CH067-301 Thursday 26 April – 28 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87
Intermediate 3
Chinese 3.3
CH068-301 Wednesday 25 April – 27 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87
Intermediate 4
Chinese 4.1
CH069-301 Thursday 26 April – 28 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87
Intermediate 5
Chinese 4.2
CH070-301
Wednesday 25 April – 27 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87
Intermediate 6
Chinese 4.3
CH071-301 Monday 23 April – 25 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87
Upper Intermediate 1
Chinese 5.1
CH072-301 Tuesday 24 April – 26 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87
Upper Intermediate 2
Chinese 5.2
CH074-301 Tuesday 24 April – 26 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87
Upper Intermediate 3
Chinese 5.3
CH073-301 Thursday 26 April – 28 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87
Advanced Chinese 1
Chinese 6.1
CH002-307 Wednesday 25 April – 27 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87
Advanced Chinese 2
Chinese 6.2
CH075-301 Tuesday 24 April – 26 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87
Advanced Chinese 3
Chinese 6.3
CH077-301 Tuesday 24 April – 26 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87
Upper Advanced
Chinese Advanced
CH076-301 Monday 23 April – 25 June 6.00-8.00pm £130/£87

An absolute beginner can join us at the start of each term. Any student who has some previous experience in learning the language is welcome to contact us and arrange to drop in for an initial assessment to help determine which class would best suit.

Evening classes run for two hours on the same evening for a ten week term. No assessment is carried out but students are encouraged to test their developing skills by sitting the globally run HSK test.

Excellence in teaching is paramount. Our teachers are seconded from Fudan University which regularly send us experienced senior teachers and a number of Masters candidates in Teaching Chinese to Speakers of Other Languages. You can see the profiles of our current and previous teachers by clicking here.

Our classes are geared for adult learners.  For younger learners please enquire about private classes.

Mapping learning on China and Chinese in Scotland

A recent initiative by SCEN, assisted by the Confucius Institute for Scotland, saw a nationwide survey of schools take place seeking information on activities and levels of learning about China and Chinese language.

The survey results will help all stakeholders to better understand levels of engagement across the country and has resulted in a digital map showing the distribution of China related learning in schools across Scotland.

A comprehensive report on this initiative by Judith McClure, Chair of the Scotland China Education Network (SCEN) can be accessed via this link

The map itself can be accessed here.