Monthly Archives: April 2016

CPD-Teaching Chinese in Scotland 2016

This free one day event for all involved or interested in the teaching of Chinese follows  saw a 50% increase in the number of registration for the successful 2015 conference rising from 94 to 142.

Taking place on Friday 24 June 2016 at 50 George Square, University of Edinburgh, the Second Annual Conference on Chinese Language Teaching in Scotland was jointly organised by the Confucius Institute for Scotland and Asian Studies in the University of Edinburgh.

Among the topics were teaching Chinese to primary school pupils and effective methods to help students learn Chinese characters.

Today, there is a growing interest in learning Chinese in schools and demand for Mandarin is rising in the business community and universities.

“We are sure those who attended picked up a lot of new ideas for more effective ways of learning and the teaching of Chinese,” said Professor Natascha Gentz, Director of the Confucius Institute for Scotland, which is celebrating 10 years of culture, education and business links.

Professor Gentz, who is also Assistant Principal (China) at the university, added: “We hope that the conference can contribute to the further expansion and successful development of Mandarin as one of the suite of modern languages in Scotland.”

Please download a conference programme for further details of the workshops and speakers.

 

 

Zheng He-When the Dragon Ships Came Thurs 9 June 19.00

The Confucius Institute for Scotland in the University of Edinburgh, in association with SCEN, is delighted to bring to Edinburgh this award winning show from Karin Schäfer of Figuren Theatre blending puppetry, video and animation.

Tickets for the public show at 7pm on 9th June will be on sale from 6.30pm at the venue- Central Hall, West Tollcross. Advance ticket sales are available via the Queens Hall box office

With two free shows for school groups running at 10.30 and 13.00 the excitement about this show is building.  But for those not in school there is still an opportunity to see the show in a ticketed evening performance at 19.00- read on!

Zheng He Web Resolution 11

Zheng He-When the Dragon Ships Came relates the tale of the fantastic journeys of this famous Chinese explorer who with his fleet of more than 300 enormous ‘dragon ships’ sailed via Indonesia, India, and the Arabian Coast to Africa – almost 100 years before Columbus set sail for America. While every child in China knows the story of Zheng He’s travels, here, his adventures remain largely unknown.

ZhengHeTea

This production has won many plaudits for its innovative set design which features interaction between the screen and the action on stage. The animated films, video clips, shadow images and masks form a constantly changing visual narrative while the multi-lingual audio and musical score ensure that audience members are fully engaged by the production

Click here to see a short video extract.

ZhengHeScreen

The evening show is open to the public and will take place from 7pm-8pm in Central Hall, West Tollcross, EH3 9PB.

Doors will open at 6.30pm.  There is no age restriction on this production but age 7+ is recommended.

Tickets are £5 per single ticket or £15 for a family of 4
(2 adults+ 2 x 12yrs or under OR 1 adult + 3 x 12yrs or under).

Bookings for this event at Tollcross Central Hall is through the Queen’s Hall Box office.You can book in any of the following ways

Online: 24hrs a day at www.thequeenshall.net

By telephone:   (0131) 668 2019.
Telephone bookings operate from 10am – 5pm Monday to Saturday.  Credit & debit card bookings are accepted along with customer enquiries on the above number.

In person: The Box Office is open from 10am – 5pm Monday to Saturday on non-concert evenings, or until 15 minutes after the start of a Queen’s Hall performance.

By post: Postal bookings are accepted with cheques made  payable to “The Queen’s Hall Box Office”. Postal bookings should be sent to The Queen’s Hall Box Office, Clerk Street, Edinburgh, EH8 9JG.

By fax:  Bookings can be accepted by fax if card details for payment are included. The fax number for the Queen’s Hall is: (0131) 668 2656.

Schools which wish to send a group of students (not necessarily students studying Mandarin) should in the first instance call us on 0131 662 2180 or email info@confuciusinstitute.ac.uk.

 

 

 

Prof Kai Vogelsang, 19 May
Distinguished Lecture: 6pm

Getting the Terms Straight: Politics, State & Law in the Discourse of Chinese ‘Legalism’

‘Legalism’ is a stepchild of Chinese tradition. Long neglected by Chinese and Western scholars alike, it has until today not been properly understood. The burden of traditional terminology especially seems to have weighted down sinological scholarship and blocked inter-disciplinary approaches to the topic.

This talk will focus on some central terms of ‘legalist’ discourse – including ‘legalism’ itself – in an attempt to reach a clearer understanding of this part of Chinese tradition which is by no means a quantité negligéable.

PROFESSOR KAI VOGELSANG

vogelsangKai Vogelsang is professor of Sinology at the University of Hamburg. He studied Sinology and Economics in Hamburg and Taipei receiving a PhD in Hamburg (1997) and subsequently in Munich (2004). His fields of research are Chinese history of the pre-Qin period and the late 19th/early 20th centuries with a focus on conceptual history. 

This is the third lecture in our 2016 Distinguished Lecture Series.The venue for the talk by Professor Kai Vogelsang is the Project Room, 50 George Square, Edinburgh, EH8 9JU from 6pm on Thursday 19 May 2016. Following on from the lecture and Q&A there will be a networking drinks reception.

All Welcome. No booking is required.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fudan University credit bearing summer camp 4-15 July 2016

Shanghai’s Fudan University’s School of Economics is offer a two week credit bearing summer camp on Chinese Economy and Society.  Designed for students who wish to acquire comprehensive knowledge of China in the fields of economy, business and society the course comprises thirty-two 90 minute lectures delivered by top scholars from Fudan University, Shanghai Jiao-tong University, and Shanghai University of Finance and Economics (SHUFE).  Attendees will also take part in three company tours. The dates of the course are 4-15 July 2016 

The application fee is 400RMB with a tuition charge of 10,000RMB inclusive of all programme activities plus lunch and coffee breaks on lecture days.A range of accommodation is on offer with prices ranging from around 100RMB to 300RMB per day.

Full details of the programme can be seen here via this flier SOE SUMMER CAMP.  Additionally you can review this Chinese Economy Society @ SOE FUDAN ppt.

 

Distinguished Lecture Podcasts: Prof Qin Hui & Prof Yuri Pines

For those who missed the February or March 2016 Distinguished Lectures by Professor Qin Hui, Tsinghua University and Professor Yuri Pines we are pleased to provide these podcasts.

Prof Qin Hui: “Confucian Values and English Constitutional Monarchy: Historical Routes of China’s Modernization”

Prof Yuri Pines, “Empire without Emperors? Rethinking Aspects of China’s Modernisation”

SYNOPIS FOR PROF QIN HUI

When “cultural differences” and “civilizational clashes” are popular discourses in our intellectual thinking today, it is hard to imagine Confucian values have any affinity with Western democratic values and institutions. When Chinese Confucian scholar/officials first encountered the West in the latter half of the 19th century, however, they identified Western institutions such as English Constitutional Monarchy as very much representing Confucian values—in its true and authentic sense.

This lecture will highlight the enthusiastic embrace of Western democratic institution by a host of late Qing Confucian scholar/officials, from the first Chinese ambassador to Britain Guo Songtao (1818-1891) to Zhang Shusheng (1824-1884), a powerful Qing official whose will was for China to adopt Western democratic policy as the “foundation” for a Confucian state. They saw, for instance, the “loyalty” the English people expressed towards their Queen/King was most sincere precisely because they were detached from power. Indeed, the decency of the English constitutional monarchy ignited the dormant “ancient Confucianism” in these late Qing Confucian scholar/officials who allied themselves with Western democratic institutionalism to fight against the age-old enemy of Confucianism: the notorious and cruel dictator the First Emperor of Qin (260-210 BC).

But there was also a strong force in modern Chinese history that yearned for the wealth and power of the nation through a modern-day First Emperor facilitated by an alliance of the traditional “Legalist” thought and radical authoritarian ideology from the West. Confucianism, in any case, had not been in that company.

ProfQinHuiProfessor Qin Hui 秦晖 is Professor of History at Tsinghua University, China. His research has covered several fields in economic history, social history and history of ideas. He has published more than twenty books including Fields and Garden Poetry and Rhapsodies (田园诗与狂想曲), Ten Treatises on Tradition (传统十论), Out of the Imperial System (走出帝制), Common Baseline (共同的底线), Issues and Isms (问题与主义), Revelations from South Africa (南非的启示).

SYNOPIS FOR PROF YURI PINES

China’s republican revolution of 1911 is overwhelmingly considered – notwithstanding ongoing debates over its nature, course, and outcomes-a necessary and positive step on the country’s path toward social and political “modernization.” Yet if viewed in the context of traditional Chinese political culture, the haphazard abolition of the millennia-old monarchic form of rule appears as less prudent. In this talk Prof Pines addressed the short and long-term repercussions of China’s transformation from a monarchy into a republic and reassessed its political and cultural consequences. This renewed analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of China’s abolition of monarchic rule may be of interest to historians of traditional and modern China and also of some relevance to those concerned with China’s ongoing attempts to redefine its cultural image.

yuriBorn in Kiev, Ukraine, in 1964 Yuri Pines works at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His research focuses on political thought of pre-imperial (pre-221 BCE) China and on the political culture of imperial China. He is also involved in studies of political, social, and religious history of pre-imperial and early imperial (Qin) China and of early Chinese historiography.

Lecture Podcast: Prof Qin Hui, Tsinghua

For those who missed the February 2016 Distinguished Lecture by Professor Qin Hui, Tsinghua University on Confucian Values and English Constitutional Monarchy: Historical Routes of China’s Modernization we are pleased to provide this podcast.


When “cultural differences” and “civilizational clashes” are popular discourses in our intellectual thinking today, it is hard to imagine Confucian values have any affinity with Western democratic values and institutions. When Chinese Confucian scholar/officials first encountered the West in the latter half of the 19th century, however, they identified Western institutions such as English Constitutional Monarchy as very much representing Confucian values—in its true and authentic sense.

This lecture will highlight the enthusiastic embrace of Western democratic institution by a host of late Qing Confucian scholar/officials, from the first Chinese ambassador to Britain Guo Songtao (1818-1891) to Zhang Shusheng (1824-1884), a powerful Qing official whose will was for China to adopt Western democratic policy as the “foundation” for a Confucian state. They saw, for instance, the “loyalty” the English people expressed towards their Queen/King was most sincere precisely because they were detached from power. Indeed, the decency of the English constitutional monarchy ignited the dormant “ancient Confucianism” in these late Qing Confucian scholar/officials who allied themselves with Western democratic institutionalism to fight against the age-old enemy of Confucianism: the notorious and cruel dictator the First Emperor of Qin (260-210 BC).

But there was also a strong force in modern Chinese history that yearned for the wealth and power of the nation through a modern-day First Emperor facilitated by an alliance of the traditional “Legalist” thought and radical authoritarian ideology from the West. Confucianism, in any case, had not been in that company.

ProfQinHuiProfessor Qin Hui 秦晖 is Professor of History at Tsinghua University, China. His research has covered several fields in economic history, social history and history of ideas. He has published more than twenty books including Fields and Garden Poetry and Rhapsodies (田园诗与狂想曲), Ten Treatises on Tradition (传统十论), Out of the Imperial System (走出帝制), Common Baseline (共同的底线), Issues and Isms (问题与主义), Revelations from South Africa (南非的启示).